B-52 Loses an Engine

B-52H mishap

4 JAN, 2017, MINOT AIR FORCE BASE, N.D. —   A Boeing B-52H Stratofortress (61-0001) of the 23rd Bomb Squadron, 5th Bomb Wing based at Minot AFB, North Dakota suffered an inflight mishap when the number three engine dropped off during a training flight on Wednesday, the Air Force has confirmed following questions from Defense News.

It fell the fuck off!

Because the B-52 runs on eight Pratt & Whitney TF33-P-3/103 turbofan engines, pilots were able to land the aircraft safely without any injury to the five personnel on board. The Air Force has since dispatched a UH-1N Huey helicopter to recover engine debris, which was found located in an unpopulated area about 25 nautical miles northeast of Minot Air Force Base, an Air Force spokesman said in a statement.

There were no weapons onboard the B-52 and was conducting a routine training mission,”

Col. Matthew Brooks, commander of the 5th Bomb Wing, part of Air Force Global Strike Command’s Eighth Air Force, created a safety investigation board to determine what caused the mishap .

On 16 JUL, 2018, the Air Force issued it’s report of the mishap. The cause of the mishap was due to the first stage fan disk of the Pratt & Whitney TF33 engine had failed in mid-air and caused the Number Three engine to break off the wing of the bomber.

MISHAP REPORT

The Real Reason for the Crash of Air France Flight 4590

concorde-crash flight 4590

Concorde pilot John Hutchinson presents clear evidence that the French authorities, who conducted the crash investigation, covered up the true cause and tried to blame Continental airways engineers and design weaknesses in Concorde.

Air France Flight 4590 was an international charter flight, from Charles de Gaulle Airport, Paris to John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York, flown by an Aérospatiale-BAC Concorde. On 25 July 2000 at 15:43 UTC, the aircraft serving the flight (registration F-BTSC) crashed on take off.

Chain of Events

F-BTSC was in maintenance prior to this flight. The left main landing gear was disassembled to correct a problem. When reassembled, a wheel spacer was not reinstalled and was found still sitting on a shelf after the crash. The aircraft had done four flights with this defect prior to the crash so it wasn’t the prime cause.

The cause of the crash was pilot error.

The Captain overrode procedure and ordered the tanks to be filled to the brim instead of the normal 80%. He ordered more fuel than was required to be put in the aft tanks used for taxiing. He allowed 19 bags, that had not been weighed, to be loaded in the aft hold. All this made the aircraft over weight and the center of gravity out of limits.

Presumably due to the weight and balance being out of limits he requested to use the runway extension, even though it was officially closed because it was being re-surfaced. He also elected to take off with an 8 kt tail wind.

On take off the aircraft struck the ledge as it left the overrun and came on the to the runway. The effect was not unlike driving your car over a square curb at a 90 degree angle. This caused the wheels of the left main gear to turn 90 degrees to the left as they had no spacer to constrain them. The tires overheated and burst starting the fire.

The malfunctioning gear and burst tire forced the aircraft to slew to the left. It was then that it struck a runway light. Debris from the light struck the underside of the left wing. This caused a shockwave in the fuel of the over-filled tank. Fuel spewed from the bottom of the wing which was set on fire by the tire fire.

Investigation photo showing where aircraft departed the runway at taxiway S3.

At this point the aircraft was past V1 speed of 180kts and the Captain was committed to the takeoff. As the aircraft climbed off the runway, the Left Engine Fire Light came on. The co-pilot incorrectly shut down the engine. The fire light was false because the fire was overheating the engine. Although the engine was overheating, it was still performing at 100%. The correct procedure for an overheat would be to continue operation until the aircraft safely airborne and then shut down the engine.

Air-France-4590-Runway-Events

Once airborne, with the center of gravity shifted further aft by the escaping fuel, lack of full engine power and being overweight, the aircraft stalled and crashed..

113 people were killed in the crash.
100 passengers
9 crew
4 people on the ground.

Co-pilot: “Le Bourget, Le Bourget.”
Pilot: “Too late (unclear).”
Control tower: “Fire service leader, correction, the Concorde is returning to runway zero nine in the opposite direction.”
Pilot: “No time, no (unclear).”
Co-pilot: “Negative, we’re trying Le Bourget” (four switching sounds).
Co-pilot: “No (unclear).”
Control tower: “De Gaulle tower from fire service leader, can you give me the situation of the Concorde?”
Cockpit Area Microphone (CAM): (Sound of effort)
End of recording