HAPPY VETERANS DAY

But why today? Today marks the 100th anniversary of the end of World War One. At the eleventh hour on the eleventh day of the eleventh month, the guns fell silent.

Siege gun. Image living in the trenches that this fired on.

THE COST

A Truce was declared and that would lead to the end of the Great War. The war to end all wars. There were 20 million deaths and 21 million wounded. There 1.8 billion people on the planet in 1918. Between 1914 and 1918, 4.5% had been killed or horribly wounded. To put that in perspective, the United States has an unemployment rate of 4.5 percent. Look around you. Think of everyone you know that doesn’t have a job as dead.

For this reason, the politicians and most of the population called the Great War, “The war to end all wars”. It was that horrible.

THE RED POPPY

Gathering poppies.

The remembrance poppy was inspired by the World War I poem “In Flanders Fields”. Its opening lines refer to the many poppies that were the first flowers to grow in the churned-up earth of soldiers’ graves in Flanders, a region of Belgium.

 

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

But it wasn’t was it? World War One was followed by World war Two. That’s what we call them. The veterans of World War Two just called it, “The War”.

369th Infantry Regiment

“Don’t Tread On Me, God Damn, Lets Go”

The 369th Infantry Regiment was first black American infantry regiment to fight in World War I, the 369th spent more time in the trenches and under fire — 191 days — than any other U.S. unit. A National Guard regiment, the 369th recruited out of New York City in large numbers, and German soldiers who witnessed their battlefield prowess quickly dubbed them the Harlem Hellfighters.

TODAY

This country has been at war now for a record 17 years. The current casualty rate is lower that training casualties of the 1980’s. But for the young man, and now young woman today, a fire fight in Kandahar or Iraq is exactly the same for them as it was for their great-great grandfathers when they “went over the top” and charged artillery and massed machine guns fighting for maybe a mile of ground.

So wish everyone a Happy Veterans Day. Where the red poppies. Shake a vet’s hand and thank them for their service. But do so knowing that you will never……never know what it was to go through what they did.


And we did it for you.

 

HERE’S TWO MOVIES TO WATCH BEFORE YOUTUBE TAKES THEM DOWN

https://youtu.be/zsGD_At6QRg

Creepy Stuff for Halloween

We’ve collected some stuff that will give you the willies.

This pic was taken at the Crumlin Road Prison in Belfast, Ireland -17 executions, multiple murders and suicides have all happened here. This photo was taken near Cell 13 where prisoners would spend their last night before execution -when this gentleman  jumped into a standing coffin for a photo op and as it turned out,he wasn’t alone!

“Hobo Nickels” is the name for an art form that has been around for as long as man has made coins. With the coinage of the Indian Head nickel the carving of “Hobo Nickels” became popular in the U.S.[1]

This picture was taken in Manila, Philippines on a Nokia 7250 phone.[2] Neither of the girls report any strange feeling or a presence at the time the picture was taken, but the fact that the picture has been taken with a digital camera makes the possibility of a double-exposure unlikely.

Caryl Chessman was executed at San Quentin, California on May 2, 1960. Shortly after the execution had started and Chessman was already reacting to the hydrogen cyanide gas, the telephone rang. The caller was a judge’s secretary informing the warden of a new stay of execution. The warden responded, “It’s too late; the execution has begun.” There was no way to stop the fumes or open the chamber door and remove Chessman without the fumes killing others.[3] Due to her nervousness, the secretary had initially dialed the wrong telephone number and lost valuable seconds in getting the call through.   Case in point, the photographer took this shot of an American prisoner strapped into a chair in a gas chamber as he is sentenced to death. The prisoner’s black hood carries a Westinghouse Electric Company logo.

In the early 19th century  photography became affordable to the masses.  Rather than commission a portrait in oil, it was quicker and cheaper to commemorate the dearly departed with a photo.  Children were posed in a crib or their Mother’s arms.  Adults were usually posed in a chair.[4]

Dead woman. 1839.
Dead woman. 1839.

 

Mrs. Mabel Chinnery was visiting the grave of her mother one day in 1959. She had brought along her camera to take photographs of the grave site. After snapping a few shots of her mother’s gravestone, she took an impromptu photo of her husband, who was waiting alone in the car. At least the Chinnerys thought he was alone.

When the film was developed, the couple was more than surprised to see a figure wearing glasses sitting in the back seat of the car. Mrs. Chinnery immediately recognized the image of her mother.[5]

httpv://youtu.be/OTqkZuKhA04