BOO!

Here’s some creepy, scary stuff to start the Halloween Season….Sensitive Readers should brace themselves. There is no cheesy Zombie screaming shit.

 

David Paulides has been researching people disappearing in our National Parks.  He stumbled on his first case when he was researching something else in a National park.  He contacted the National Park Service to get their list of missing persons and they said they didn’t keep one.  What?

After many letters, phone calls and emails the NPS said they could get him a list of missing persons in Yellowstone National Park and a national list.  However, the Yellowstone list would cost him about $35,000.  The national list would cost him millions.  The NPS said this was the cost of manhours to manually search NPS for missing persons stories.

The following is Part One.  Keep watch the parts on youTube and comment on the part you were listening to when you decided to stop and hide under your bed,

 

Still there?

 

Click here
The Ghosts of Indian Springs, Nevada

 

https://youtu.be/LsKzTqhXVFM

Click Picture to read about Elizabeth.

TRUE STORY
During the filming of the Ted Turner film “Gettysburg” , Civil War reenactors came from all over the country to participate in the first authorized reenactment on the actual battle field. During a break, a group of men noticed a fellow reenactor emerge from the woods. “He smelled real bad”, remembered one man. The man said to them, “Rough one today, ay boys?” The men agreed with him as they complemented him on his authentic garb. He had a quizzical look on his face and asked them how they were situated for ammunition. When they replied that they had no ammunition, the man reached into his pouch and produced a handful of musket rounds. He apologized for not having more to share. As they were inspecting their gifts the man turned and disappeared back into the woods.

Noticing that they didn’t look like the rounds issued to them, they went to the head of props for the film, who told them they weren’t issued by him. Later they made their way into Gettysburg proper to have them checked out, and were chilled to learn that they were genuine musket rounds, dating from the time of the battle.

Here’s your reward for getting this far…..

Creepy Stuff for Halloween

We’ve collected some stuff that will give you the willies.

This pic was taken at the Crumlin Road Prison in Belfast, Ireland -17 executions, multiple murders and suicides have all happened here. This photo was taken near Cell 13 where prisoners would spend their last night before execution -when this gentleman  jumped into a standing coffin for a photo op and as it turned out,he wasn’t alone!

“Hobo Nickels” is the name for an art form that has been around for as long as man has made coins. With the coinage of the Indian Head nickel the carving of “Hobo Nickels” became popular in the U.S.[1]

This picture was taken in Manila, Philippines on a Nokia 7250 phone.[2] Neither of the girls report any strange feeling or a presence at the time the picture was taken, but the fact that the picture has been taken with a digital camera makes the possibility of a double-exposure unlikely.

Caryl Chessman was executed at San Quentin, California on May 2, 1960. Shortly after the execution had started and Chessman was already reacting to the hydrogen cyanide gas, the telephone rang. The caller was a judge’s secretary informing the warden of a new stay of execution. The warden responded, “It’s too late; the execution has begun.” There was no way to stop the fumes or open the chamber door and remove Chessman without the fumes killing others.[3] Due to her nervousness, the secretary had initially dialed the wrong telephone number and lost valuable seconds in getting the call through.   Case in point, the photographer took this shot of an American prisoner strapped into a chair in a gas chamber as he is sentenced to death. The prisoner’s black hood carries a Westinghouse Electric Company logo.

In the early 19th century  photography became affordable to the masses.  Rather than commission a portrait in oil, it was quicker and cheaper to commemorate the dearly departed with a photo.  Children were posed in a crib or their Mother’s arms.  Adults were usually posed in a chair.[4]

Dead woman. 1839.
Dead woman. 1839.

 

Mrs. Mabel Chinnery was visiting the grave of her mother one day in 1959. She had brought along her camera to take photographs of the grave site. After snapping a few shots of her mother’s gravestone, she took an impromptu photo of her husband, who was waiting alone in the car. At least the Chinnerys thought he was alone.

When the film was developed, the couple was more than surprised to see a figure wearing glasses sitting in the back seat of the car. Mrs. Chinnery immediately recognized the image of her mother.[5]

httpv://youtu.be/OTqkZuKhA04