In the Words of Lenin

Listen to the words of Vladimir Lenin and ask yourself, “Is this not happening in America today? Are these not the tactics of the so-called Democratic Party?”

 

The ballot box is the purview of the unintelligent masses. True political power lies in the Courts and if not there, then the streets.

 

To belittle the socialist ideology in any way, to turn aside from it in the slightest degree means to strengthen bourgeois ideology.

 

Our schoolteacher should be raised to a standard he has never achieved, and cannot achieve, in bourgeois society. This is a truism and requires no proof.

 

The most important thing is to know how to awaken in the still undeveloped masses an intelligent attitude towards religious questions and an intelligent criticism of religions.

 

But every little difference may become a big one if it is insisted on.

 

It is not difficult to be a revolutionary when revolution has already broken out and is in spate, when all people are joining the revolution just because they are carried away, because it is the vogue, and sometimes even from careerist motives.

 

We must display determination, endurance, firmness and unanimity. We must stop at nothing. Everybody and everything must be used to save the rule of the workers and peasants, to save communism.

 

Human child birth is an act which transforms the woman into an almost lifeless, bloodstained heap of flesh, tortured, tormented and driven frantic by pain.

 

It is the duty of the revolution to put an end to compromise, and to put an end to compromise means taking the path of socialist revolution.

 

It is, of course, much easier to shout, abuse, and howl than to attempt to relate, to explain.

 

Abolition of the police, the army and the bureaucracy. The salaries of all officials, all of whom are elective and displaceable at any time, not to exceed the average wage of a competent worker.

 

Our Socialist-Revolutionaries and Mensheviks themselves share, and instill into the minds of the people, the false notion that universal suffrage “in the present-day state” is really capable of revealing the will of the majority of the working people and of securing its realization.

 

We Social-Democrats always stand for democracy, not “in the name of capitalism, ” but in the name of clearing the path for our movement, which clearing is impossible without the development of capitalism.

 

Socialists must explain to the masses that they have no other road of salvation except the revolutionary overthrow of “their” governments, and that advantage must be taken of these governments’ embarrassments in the present war precisely for this purpose.

 

Convert the imperialist war into civil war.

 

We fully regard civil wars, i.e., wars waged by the oppressed class against the oppressing class, slaves against slave-owners, serfs against land-owners, and wage-workers against the bourgeoisie, as legitimate, progressive and necessary.

 

War cannot be abolished unless classes are abolished and Socialism is created.

 

Human knowledge is not (or does not follow) a straight line, but a curve, which endlessly approximates a series of circles, a spiral. Any fragment, segment, section of this curve can be transformed (transformed one-sidedly) into an independent, complete, straight line, which then (if one does not see the wood for the trees) leads into the quagmire, into clerical obscurantism.

Capital, created by the labor of the worker, crushes the worker, ruining small proprietors and creating an army of unemployed.

 

All official and liberal science defends wage-slavery, whereas Marxism has declared relentless war on that slavery.

 

The art of any propagandist and agitator consists in his ability to find the best means of influencing any given audience, by presenting a definite truth, in such a way as to make it most convincing, most easy to digest, most graphic, and most strongly impressive.

 

Social-Democracy, however, wants, on the contrary, to develop the class struggle of the proletariat to the point where the latter will take the leading part in the popular Russian revolution, i.e., will lead this revolution to a the democratic-dictatorship of the proletariat and the peasantry.

 

Are we to build the Party on the basis of that already formed and welded core of Social-Democrats which brought about the Party Congress, for instance, and which should enlarge and multiply Party organizations of all kinds; or are we to content ourselves with the soothing phrase that all who help are Party members?

 

This struggle must be organized, according to “all the rules of the art”, by people who are professionally engaged in revolutionary activity. The fact that the masses are spontaneously being drawn into the movement does not make the organization of this struggle less necessary. On the contrary, it makes it more necessary.

 

The progressive historical role of capitalism may be summed up in two brief propositions: increase in the productive forces of social labour, and the socialisation of that labour. But both these facts manifest themselves in extremely diverse processes in different branches of the national economy.

 

General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson

Before you start calling him a racist and tearing his statue down, you might want to read this.

Thomas Jonathan  Jackson was born January 21, 1824, Clarksburg, WV. Clarksville was then part of Virginia.  Jackson was accepted to the United States Military Academy at West Point.  He graduated 17th out of 59 students in the Class of 1846.

Jackson distinguished himself during the Mexican/American War.  Commanding a battery of artillery, he found himself of the vanguard of the entire American Army.  On one occasion, his battery of 3 six pounders and a brigade of infantry chased the entine Mexican Army for six miles. For these actions, he was promoted to Brevet Major.

After the war, he was posted to several Forts acting as the quartermaster or commisariate.  In 1851 he resigned from the Army and accepted a position at the Virginia Military Institute.  He taught  Natural and Experimental Philosophy (physics) and instructed the cadets in artillery.

LIBERALS PAY ATTENTION

By the time the Civil War started, Jackson had carved out a comfortable middle class life.  He owned a small farm and a tannery.  He also owned six slaves.  Hetty, Cyrus, and George, a mother and two teenage sons were received as a wedding present. Another, Albert, requested that Jackson purchase him and allow him to work for his freedom; he was employed as a waiter in one of the Lexington hotels and Jackson rented him to VMI. The slave, Amy also requested that Jackson purchase her from a public slave auction and she served the family as a cook and housekeeper. The sixth, Emma, was a four-year-old orphan with a learning disability, accepted by Jackson from an aged widow. Jackson was not a harsh master.  He treated his slaves more like employees or sometimes family.  All were provided a pension for old age except for Emma who’s care was provided for her entire life.

Jackson was revered by many of the African Americans in town, both slaves and free blacks. In 1855, he was instrumental in the organization of Sunday School classes for blacks at the Presbyterian Church. His second wife, Mary Anna Jackson, taught with Jackson, as “he preferred that my labors should be given to the colored children, believing that it was more important and useful to put the strong hand of the Gospel under the ignorant African race, to lift them up.” 

The pastor, Dr. William Spottswood White, described the relationship between Jackson and his Sunday afternoon students: “In their religious instruction he succeeded wonderfully. His discipline was systematic and firm, but very kind. … His servants reverenced and loved him, as they would have done a brother or father. … He was emphatically the black man’s friend.” He addressed his students by name and they, in turn, referred to him affectionately as “Marse Major”.

Thomas J. Jackson was called many things in his life.,  hypochondriac, idiot, aloof, religious Zealot and genius.  His nicknames included “Tom Fool”, “Old Jack” and of course “Stonewall”.

THE CIVIL WAR

Jackson’s first assignment was to march his VMI cadets to Richmond and use the cadets to train the thousands of volunteers that were descending on the city.  He and his cadets also provided security for the hanging of John Brown.

In combat, his Area of Operation was the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia.  He had fought suscession until the last minute and only agreed to command the First Virginia Brigade when Virginia was invaded.  He was the first Commander to realize the brutality required in modern warfare.  Later in the war, Union Generals Grant and Sherman adopted the same tatics Jackson had used.  Historians agree that Jackson’s agressiveness and ability to see enemy weaknesses and taking immeadiate action produced the lengedary victories of the Army of Northern Virginia under General Lee.

On May 2nd, during the Battle of Chancellorsville, General “Stonewall” Jackson was shot my his own pickets.  Surgeons amputated is left arm.  He survived the amputation and yet died of pneumonia on May 10, 1863.

On his deathbed, he asked his wife what his prognosis was.  She told him the the doctors feared he would die this day. He then asked what day it was ans she said it was Sunday. “Very well”, he replied “I always wanted to die on a Sunday”.

Dr. McGuire wrote an account of Jackson’s final hours and last words:

“A few moments before he died he cried out in his delirium, “Order A.P. Hill to prepare for action! Pass the infantry to the front rapidly! Tell Major Hawks”—then stopped, leaving the sentence unfinished. Presently a smile of ineffable sweetness spread itself over his pale face, and he said quietly, and with an expression, as if of relief, ‘Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees.”

Jackson is well portrayed by Stephen Lang, in the movie, “Gods and Generals”.

To read more about the life of this remarable man, please read

 
I’m looking at you Taylor Morton.

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